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GUEST POST: Coming Back Home by Megan Linden

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You can never go back home, they say. I think about it from time to time—both in my personal life and while I’m writing. Is it really impossible to go back?

In literal sense it isn’t, of course. If you traveled one way, you can turn around and take the same way back. Connor, one of the main characters in Coming Back Home, left Harrington Hills and then came back. That’s the starting point of the story—his return.

But I would argue—and I’m pretty sure that’s what the author of the saying at the start of this post meant—that you can never go back home the same. We can never go back to the same “home” we remember, either. We change, and the people we left behind change, as well.

Most of us have experienced this at least once—I know I’ve had. I left home to study in another city, half the country away. And the changes weren’t easy to spot as they were happening, but after a year or so, I realized that they were there. They happened. I remember in my second or third year at the Uni, my grandfather said something about how he couldn’t wait for me to go back home after I got my diploma, and that’s when I realized that I wouldn’t be going back. Home had become something else for me at some point along the way. These days I still live in the city I’d come to study in, and my hometown is a place where I go to visit my family. I left, and I stayed away.

But some people do go back, more or less willingly, more or less according to their previous plans. Connor had never intended to come back to Harrington Hills. As a young boy, he couldn’t wait to leave, and once he’d left it behind, he’d thought it was for good.

Circumstances lead him back to his hometown, but he’s not the same person he once was. His life isn’t the same it once was. And Jack—the person Connor hadn’t let himself think about too much when he was away—had changed, too.

We can never go back home, but it’s on us to decide what that means. And that’s what Coming Back Home is about. Who are these young men now? What’s home to them? Can they find their way to each other—or, perhaps, find another path?

What I’ve come to realize is that, in a way, coming back home is at least partially building a home once again (that title was taken by the previous book in the series, though, heh). It’s building on the existing fundaments, but what we build after we’ve come back can vary from what it once was. Or it can be pretty similar to the original. There’s no wrong answer here.

Coming Back Home

Harrington Hills #3

Jack Harrington told everyone who asked that he got over Connor long time ago. And while he still hasn’t managed to convince himself, he moves on with his life. He doesn’t have a choice. Connor is gone for good.

Or is he?

Connor Warden didn’t plan to ever come back to Harrington Hills, but with an infant in tow, that is exactly what he does. His daughter needs a pack and he is going to give it to her.

When Jack and Connor’s lives literally collide again, will they be able to go back to what have been and find their connection once more? Or is the divide between them too deep to ever fully get over?

Buy links:

Pride Publishing | Amazon

Find the author:

www.meganlinden.com

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